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Congresswoman Schwartz Response to JOBS Act Inquiry

Official House photo of Allyson Schwartz
Official House photo of Allyson Schwartz (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
I wrote my Congresswoman, the Honorable Allyson Schwartz, asking her to encourage the SEC to issue the guidelines on crowdsourcing capital, as directed by Congress in the Jumpstart Our Business Act ("Jobs" Act.  Here is her response:

As I work to address the needs and concerns of American families and businesses across the 13th Congressional District, it is important that I hear your views. I want you to know that I always take your views into consideration as I work to make the right decisions to revitalize our economy, invest in our future and meet our obligations. I appreciate you taking the time to contact my office and I want to share my views regarding our economy.

We have a lot of work to do to strengthen our economy. To succeed, we must restore consumer and investor confidence and ensure American businesses can compete in a global economy. Economic competitiveness can be achieved through a skilled workforce; balanced tax policy; and investments in innovation, education and infrastructure. As a senior member of the House Budget Committee and Vice-Chair of the moderate, pro-business New Democrat Coalition, I am actively working to identify and enact reforms that will reduce our nation's deficit while spurring economic growth.

Our region has remarkable assets, including a skilled workforce, dozens of leading colleges and universities, and diverse industries ranging from manufacturing to biotechnology to financial services. We also face significant challenges, with far too many Pennsylvanians out of work and too many businesses worrying about the economic uncertainty facing our nation. To reach our full potential and promote private sector economic growth both nationally and in our area, we must incentivize businesses to grow here in the United States. That is why I am a cosponsor of the Bring Jobs Home Act (H.R. 5542), which provides tax incentives for companies to relocate businesses in the U.S. and eliminates tax breaks for companies that ship jobs overseas.

I am proud that Pennsylvania companies are on the front lines of innovation, and I have taken a lead role in enacting laws such as the "Research and Development Tax Credit" that enable businesses to grow and thrive. In Southeastern Pennsylvania, research, medical innovation and the life sciences industries are vital to our economic growth. By increasing access to capital and encouraging investment and hiring, we are ensuring that the ideas, technology and products of tomorrow are made in America today.

The American economy has come a long way from 2008 when we were losing 800,000 jobs a month. In the last 27 consecutive months, the private sector has added more than 4.25 million jobs, and more jobs were created in 2011 than in any year since 2005. While we are seeing signs of growth, too many Americans are still out of work and too many families are struggling.

 To strengthen the American economy, we must promote emerging industries to enable American companies to remain on the frontlines of innovation, ensure every American has access to affordable educational opportunities to build a successful workforce, and invest in transportation and infrastructure that will rebuild our local economies and reinvigorate our communities. Please be assured that I will continue to fight for opportunities for American businesses to thrive and the private sector to flourish.

Again, thank you for contacting me and please do not hesitate to reach out to me in the future for more information or if I can help in any way. I will continue to work on your behalf to ensure the federal government is fiscally responsible, accountable, and responsive to my constituents.

 

Sincerely,


Allyson Y. Schwartz
Member of Congress
 
 
I also wrote to Senators Casey and Toomey, but have not received a response.
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